Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Sometimes you need to print your work for editing.

The eyes resister things differently when seeing your writing on a different medium. Sometimes, one must resort to the old-fashion pen-and-paper method when editing. If you’re wanting to save the trees, try an eBook reader such as a Kindle. If there’s a section that you want to pay particular attention to, then just print that section. Don’t do ALL of your editing on a computer screen; you will miss things.
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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: San serif is without feet.

Serif and sans serif fonts are two different groups of font styles. Serif fonts have the little lines that extend out from either the top or bottom of characters. San serif fonts don’t. Most web-based editor programs use sans serif fonts. For those of you who don’t know, Times New Roman is a serif font, whereas Arial is a sans serif font. (Wow… How many times can someone use the word serif in one paragraph?)Read More

Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Love is all around. Use it.

Regardless if your story is a romance or not, you can take advantage of the lovey-dovey that is in the air within your writing. You don’t need to write a love scene. Perhaps your character is skeptical about love and wants to blow it up — metaphorically speaking. Use the goings-on of the current season as a source of inspiration for that next plot twist.
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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Make sure your research is up to date

When writing, one must always do their research, but you should also ensure that your research is up to date. Just because you research something a year ago doesn’t mean that things haven’t changed in that time. It only takes 15 seconds for a massive earthquake to reduce a major metropolis to rubble.
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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: All characters have emotions, even if they don’t show them.

There are certain personalities that are experts at hiding their emotions from the outside world, where other characters wear their emotions on their sleeve. The way in which these characters react to their surroundings will be very different. However, if your point-of-view character is of the type that hides their emotions, you still need to show those emotions to the reader — through internal reactions and thoughts. Books like The Emotion Thesaurus are brilliant resources to help writers get inside the heads of their characters, showing the internal reactions to emotions.
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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Environmental changes occur gradual, unless…

Environmental changes, such as moving from a desert terrain into a forest, occur gradually, unless there is an external reason to explain the abrupt change, e.g. rock slides, massive storms, bombs, magic. If you don’t want to explain the reason in your story, then have one of your characters comment on the oddity of the abrupt change and move on.Read More

Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Instead of deleting that scene, move it to an outtakes file.

During the developmental editing phase, you will likely encounter scenes that you wrote that doesn’t add anything to the story. You may love the scene so much, but it just has to go. Never just hit the delete button on that precious scene. Move it into an outtakes file that you can refer to at some later stage. You never know, that precious scene might be the premise of some other story.Read More

Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Farther and Further…

Farther and Further have similar usages, however, they mean different things. Farther relates to a physical distance (the root word is “far”). Further is  a metaphorical construct. “How much farther?” “He intended to further his education.”Read More