Recent Posts

Hidden Traps by Judy L Mohr (Coming Soon)

Working with Graphic Designers

My readers will know that I’m working toward the publication of Hidden Traps: A Writer’s Guide to Protecting Your Online Platform, due to be released August 2017. It’s been an interesting journey: revisiting my nonfiction writing roots; learning about ISBNs and publishing options; and devising marketing strategies. It has definitely been a steep learning curve. I have learnt many things along this journey, topics of which will become future blog posts, but there is one aspect that I thought was perfect to reveal now.

Graphic designers think in images.

Looking back at it now, it seems so logical, but at the time that I commissioned the cover for Hidden Traps, it was a concept that completely eluded me. I’m a writer and editor. I spend so much of my time looking at how to craft that perfect sentence to convey the right picture. I’ve commissioned artwork before, providing only a line from my stories and getting the perfect image in return. Surely, I can do the same for a cover.

I’ll hang my head in shame now, because clearly my words weren’t enough.

Read More

A Methodical Way to Marketing (Guest Blog)

This week’s post was written by Joynell Shultz, where she shares some of her insights on marketing books — knowledge gained through trial and error, and a lot of research. Perhaps you can gain a few ideas that might work for you too.

Read More

Trick from the Editor’s Hat: A List of Crutch Words

While writing, we often have a list of words that we’ll fall back on when we can’t think of another word to write. Sometimes, we don’t even realise that we’re doing it. It’s not until our critique partners, beta readers, or editors point it out to us that we see the repetitive word glaring at us.

“How could I have missed that? It’s as obvious as the nose on my face.”

Well, it’s quite easy to miss things when you don’t know that they’re a problem. However, the solution is surprisingly simple.

Read More
Punctuation marks

Cooking with Commas

There is much confusion about commas and other punctuation. Often writers get them confused. Hell, even editors have been known to get a little muddled. For commas, there is a significant amount of debate over the correct usage, particularly the Oxford comma. Many editors will agree that commas seem to be disappearing from text. However, one little comma can change the entire meaning of a sentence.

Read More

The Synopsis for Editing and Writing

Those who are heading down the road toward traditional publication will be familiar with this beast known as a synopsis. Many agents and publishers require that you submit a 1/2-page synopsis with your submission materials. The chore of writing a synopsis that length is a frightening task and many writers have been known to want to run screaming. So, when I mention that writers should write synopses as an editing tool, it’s not surprising that many look at me like I’m crazy. But believe it or not, an “editorial synopsis” can help you craft the perfect story.

Read More

When is writing classified as published?

The publishing industry has changed in a big way, thanks to the Internet, social media and self-publishing. While some aspects have opened doors to so many writers who would have struggled in a big way to become a published author, there are some aspects that have actually closed the doors to traditional publication paths.

Writing is PUBLISHED the moment it’s in the public domain. Think twice about hitting that submit button to your blog or sites like WattPad. Let me explain further…

Read More

Drum roll, please… (Cover Reveal)

It has been a long time in the works, but finally it’s happening. Check out the new cover for “Hidden Traps: A Writer’s Guide to Protecting Your Online Platform” by Judy L Mohr, to be released August 1st, 2017.

Read More

Be a Good Reader of the Unpublished

There is a mantra among many writers: to be a good writer, you need to be a good reader. Many have taken this to mean that you need to read widely, reading every published book you can get your hands on. Some insist that you need to read at least a book a week while others spout off that it’s one a month. However, is all that reading of the published works really doing your writing any good? Let me explain.

Read More