Recent Posts

Potter’s Herbal Cyclopaedia

If you haven’t already checked out the full website of Black Wolf Editorial Services, then you might be interested to know that there is a list of recommended books —recommended by the Black Wolf editor for writers to help you craft your stories, edit your manuscripts and get your name out there. These are all books that the Black Wolf editor uses herself on occasion within her personal writing and editing.

One of the books that is incredibly useful from a fantasy-world perspective is Potter’s Herbal Cyclopaedia by Elizabeth M. Williamson.

Read More

The Real Cost of Editing

I have recently joined a freelancing site in an attempt to drum up business. Let’s face it, struggling writers often don’t have a lot of cash; however, in going through the job listings, I’ve noticed a trend. Many writers don’t actually have a true understanding of how much editing really costs.

I have encountered many jobs where a person has a budget of US$10, but they are wanting their manuscript of unspecified length to be fully edited by an experienced editor. That in itself is a complete joke, but the sheer number of them (many of whom are located in the US) has driven me to write this post. I feel the need to highlight to my readers exactly how much time goes into editing, and why you need to be prepared to pay in the order of US$200 – US$2000, depending on the type of editing you require and the editor’s experience.

Read More

The Book Doctor is in the house!

There is a term that has been bandied around the internet and is starting to make the rounds of conferences and writing forums. It’s a term that describes that type of person whom one might want to hire during the early stages of a manuscript’s life (or later stages if a book is struggling to gain reader engagement). The term: Book Doctor or Plot Doctor. It’s an interesting buzz term. However, I have encountered other terms that also refer to the same type of editor.

Book Doctor = Manuscript Assessor = Developmental Editor

Yep, you read that right, folks. Book Doctor is just another term for a developmental editor. And guess what… That’s exactly the type of editor that I am.

So, what does a Book Doctor or Developmental Editor actually do?

Read More

Happy New Years

There is no time like the present to reaffirm your goals as a writer. Make your goals public, but most importantly, make them real. Yes, dream big, but sometimes, you need to take little steps to obtain that ultimate dream. However, by making your goals public, I have found that it creates a level of accountability, among other things.
Read more about the benefits of public goals here.

Every year, I make my own writing goals public on my personal website, and every year, one of my goals is to help other writers to achieve their goals.

To that end, I’m pleased to announce a New Years Resolution special.

Read More
Hidden Traps by Judy L Mohr

Reviews and Mixed Emotions

Well… As every writer knows, reviews are important. However, reviews seem to be a fickled beast. If one was to receive a large number of 4- and 5-stars, someone like me starts to question how many of those reviews were posted by friends and family. The odd negative review actually gives merit to those high-ranking reviews. On the flip side, if you have a large number of negative reviews, readers will begin to steer clear of your book (possibly even future books), and sales will go down. To complicate matters, if your book has hardly any reviews at all (good or bad), people are leery and unwilling to try their hand at something new — especially from a new, untested author.

Let’s not forget that getting reviews is a mission and a half.

For my book, Hidden Traps, I didn’t quite know what to expect, and now I feel all confused and uncertain.

Read More
Email

Fan or Scam

Recently, I encountered a new type of email scam. Well, it actually found me by way of my inbox, but the nature of the scam was beyond laughable. It’s triggered by someone subscribing to my newsletter.

Rest assured that my mailing lists have not been tampered with in any way. This scam originates from the subscriber end. Let me set the stage.

Read More

#NaNoWriMo Validation Tricks

We are approaching the end of the month, and the validation window for NaNoWriMo is now open. To be a winner on the NaNoWriMo site, you need to clock in at 50,000 words, at least. However, sometimes, the validation process of those 50,000 words can be a little tricky, especially if you were a NaNoWriMo Rebel.

Perhaps you didn’t work on a new project, but continued on the project that you have working on for the last few month. (I did this.) Maybe you were working on multiple projects at the same time, all in different files. (Guilty as charged.) It’s conceivable that the allure of editing drew you in, for whatever reason, and you needed to work your writing hours away with your editor’s hat on. (Um… Yep. That was me too.) Or maybe you decided to divide your creative energies between writing and something else, like drawing. (Nope, this one wasn’t me. I can’t draw to save my life.)

Whatever the reason that a pure copy/paste of 50,000 words into the validator on NaNoWriMo is not feasible, there are some tricks that you can play to make your life easier.

Read More

Refueling the Writing Muse

We are approaching the middle of the NaNoWriMo season, and it’s about this time of the month when some writers start to run out of steam. Whatever motivation they had when they embarked on the challenge has begun to wane. It’s time to refuel the muse, so we can keep going.

Here are 9 different methods that could help you get back into the flow of writing.

Read More

This #NaNoWriMo, don’t focus just on word counts.

As the clock clicks over into November 1st, writers around the world will embark on the NaNoWriMo challenge.

No doubt, some of you are wondering what NaNoWriMo is. Well, as a writer, you commit yourself to writing 50,000 words in one month — you commit to writing a complete first draft of a novel. For some, it is a daunting goal, but as someone who has taken part in every NaNoWriMo and CampNaNoWriMo event since 2014, I can tell you that it’s worth the challenge and effort.

Every year, without fail, there will be a few who work at insane rates, pumping out 50,000 words within the first few days. Some even achieve this within the first 24 hours. No, I’m not exaggerating. Within my home region, there is always at least one, frequently two or three, with another two or three who hit 50,000 words within the first week. However, I actually feel sad for the ones  who rush to pump out those 50,000 words in such a short time, because in my opinion they have totally missed the point behind NaNoWriMo.

The real goal of NaNoWriMo is to spend an entire month writing your novel, aiming to complete it. If you finish early, you go back and flesh out some of the scenes. And if hit 50,000 words early but still haven’t finished the novel, you keep going until you’ve written the words The End. You write every day, forming a habit for writing that will carry you through into December and beyond.

Read More