Editor’s Blog

Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: A picture could be the source of inspiration.

A large portion of the population are visual people, where sights around us invoke thoughts are emotions. When writing, take advantage of this trait by having a picture of your character or your setting next to you to draw inspiration from. When it’s for personal use, the internet is a treasure trove of inspirational images.

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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Use your emotions in your writing

Life happens around us, sometimes faster than we can keep up. Tragedy is always waiting around the corner, preparing to pounce when we least expect it. Take note of your emotions and the sensations that you’re experiencing as a result of that tragedy. Use it in your writing. Pour everything you are into that small snippet of story. You will be drained as a result, but you won’t regret it. While the narrative might need to be edited, the emotions will leap off the page to assault the reader. They will follow your journey with you, and maybe join you […]

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Scott Pack’s How to Perfect Your Submission

Followers of this blog will know that I don’t do book reviews — it’s something that I just don’t do. However, I’ve noticed that the list of recommended books is growing. Hence, I should probably at least explain why those books are on the list. Some are obvious, like the dictionaries and style guides. Some are…not so obvious.

So, let’s start with one of the first books I had put on that list. I’m talking about Scott Pack’s How to Perfect Your Submission.

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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Use first-line indentation, not tabs.

Within the standard manuscript format, the first line of each paragraph should be indented by 0.5 inch. However, the number of writers who manually indent the first line of paragraphs using a tab is astounding. Writers should use the built-in first-line indentation for paragraphing. As paragraphs are moved around, first lines are automatically dealt with. In addition, any tab marks need to be removed during typesetting phases, as they add issues when dealing with eBook files. Why make more work for yourself, if you don’t have to?

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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Google Earth is a writer’s friend.

If you are using real landmarks or cities in your writing, do your homework to describe the locations accurately. Google Earth is a writer’s friend, as most places you can visit using the street view. It adds something special if you can accurately describe the structure of any landmark or building.

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No Junk Mail

Save Me From Spam Hell

So, there is this website that is offering something free and you want it. Let’s face it, free things are always good — well, most of the time they’re good. However, the moment you sign up for that free thing, handing over your email, you know you’re going to be giving the owners of that email list permission to send you spam. You don’t want that. So, what is a girl to do?

Easy. Use an email specifically intended for nothing but spam.

But for writers, it’s not a simple matter of spam versus general communications. You also have administration details, submissions and blog subscriptions. The email inbox of a writer can quickly become a nightmare. Important emails can become buried without you even realizing it.

Do you want to fight the email crazies? Well, here’s how.

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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Search-and-replace two spaces with one space.

There was a time when it was standard to put two space characters after each sentence before beginning the next. This was how I was taught to type, and I’m only in my early-40s. However, this is no longer the practice. The introduction of modern typesetting and justification algorithms mean that two spaces can result in gaps that are too large between sentences. Industry professionals now specify that we use only one space between sentences.

Retraining the brain to do this has taken me many long years, but there is a simple solution that will work every time, even when you forget. Run a search-and-replace, hunting out all the places where you use two space characters, and replace them with only one space character. All word-processing programs have the search-and-replace feature, so why not use it. (I do this as a matter of habit before I send a manuscript out the door.)

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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Reread your last paragraph.

Every time you take a little break from your writing, even a toileting break, when you sit down again, reread what you had just written (at least the last paragraph). If there are any obvious, glaring errors that you can’t resist the urge to edit, then do so, but don’t dwell on them. Rereading your work during initial drafting is not for editing purposes, but rather to help you get back into the train of thought so you can carry on writing.

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Coffee

Author Interviews on Radio – Guest Blog from Jessie Sanders

Writing takes a community, sharing ideas, and supporting one another. So, when we get approached with an article that shares hard-earned knowledge, we couldn’t be happier to pass that information.

Today’s post is written by Jessica Sanders — host of Jessie’s Coffee Shop on KLRNRadio. You might want to take note of some of the tips that Jessie give writers on how to prepare for author interviews on radio and podcasts.

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