Editor’s Blog

Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Hang a lantern on the unexpected detail.

If you incorporate into your story a detail that one would not expect, then hang a lantern on it by having your characters/narrative comment about how it’s not expected. For example, your spy character might carry a Sig Sauer pistol with a safety. Well, many will argue that Sig Sauer doesn’t manufacture pistols with a safety, but if you call them, they will link you to approximately half-a-dozen different models that do have safeties. Your character might be gloating in the fact that she carries one of those few.

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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Can’t see the scene? Make notes and move on.

When writing a first draft, don’t feel obligated to write every single scene out in full. Sometimes our imaginations just don’t see the little details — fight scenes, in particular, can be the most complicated to write because you might not be sure whose POV you should be using. Make notes about what you can see. Write down the details that are vital that you do know. Then move on. The nitty-gritty is something that you can always come back to when you have a few more details.

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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Keep a spreadsheet of modern words not in the dictionary.

With the introduction of smartphones, touchscreens and other technologies, not all the modern words have made it into the dictionaries yet. To complicate matters, there are many different ways of writing some modern words, e.g. touch screens, touchscreens, touch-screens. For these words that aren’t in your chosen dictionary, pick a spelling/punctuation and put the list into a spreadsheet to refer to when editing in the future. Consistency is the key.

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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: For a first draft, start a story where you NEED to.

Any story, be it a novel, short story or flash fiction, is a slice of life. Your story won’t start right at the beginning. Saying that, if you are writing a first draft, write the story from the point you NEED to, just to get it onto paper or into the computer. Don’t worry if you are writing a scene that will likely be removed during the editing phase. Finding the right place to actually start a story is one of the most difficult tasks of developmental editing.

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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: Small steps are needed to make the giant leap.

You hear it often, but how many actually listen: take that big goal and divide it into smaller, more manageable chunks. This a philosophy can be applied to every aspect of our lives. For a writer, this means looking at that draft in sections. If you’re writing a first draft, but aiming for a specific word count (like one would during NaNoWriMo), you don’t try to get your full word count in one night (unless you’re a masochist). Instead, you write one chapter, one paragraph, one sentence at a time. It’s the same with editing. Even a long jumper needs to […]

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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: You can’t edit a blank page.

I’ve tried and tried and tried, but no matter how hard I try, I can’t edit a blank page—neither can you. When writing a first draft, it doesn’t need to be perfect, it just needs to be written. Even if you put down a paragraph at a time, a sentence at a time, it’s still one more paragraph or sentence than what you had before. Just keep writing until you write those precious words of “The End.”

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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: If in doubt, check the dictionary.

Don’t always rely on the spellchecker. Actually check a dictionary. The issue is mainly those words that have multiple spellings with different meanings depending on context. If in doubt, always check a dictionary. Oxford English Dictionary is best for those using UK English. Merriam-Webster is the most common for US English.

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Helpful Tips

Tip of the Day: CampNaNoWriMo is about building a community

For those participating in CampNaNoWriMo, keep in mind that these sorts of events are actually about building your writing community. Yes, you are working toward a word-count goal, one you’ve specified, but there is a reason that they encourage participation in cabins. Get to know the others in your cabin and start networking. You’ll need that support as you continue along your writing journey.

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